1. Why Breastfed Babies Are So Smart

    by
    Comment
    “Many studies over the years have shown that children who are breastfed score higher on IQ tests, but until now the exact cause has been a mystery. Some scientists said it was something in the milk, others that it’s about the bonding between mother and baby and others still that...
  2. How To Make Your Kids Smarter: 10 Steps Backed By Science

    by
    Comment
    “I’ve explored the science behind what makes kids happier, what type of parenting works best and what makes for joyful families. But what makes children — from babies up through the teen years — smarter? Here are 10 things science says can help: 1) Music Lessons Plain and simple: research...
  3. For Better or Worse, Siblings Shape Our Close Relationships

    by
    Comment
    “We all bring our early ways of interacting with our families to our adult close relationships. Much of the existing research on how early family relationships affect how adult couples interact focuses on attachment style. According to this research, your inner model of relationships, based on how you were raised...
  4. Five Myths About Young People and Social Media

    by
    Comment
    “Teenagers have always been attracted to public spaces where they can hang out with friends, find new friends, and talk endlessly with peers about matters that concern them, away from parents and other authority figures. Such gatherings are crucial to human development; they are how teenagers expand their social horizons,...
  5. Family Problems In Childhood Affect Brain Development

    by
    Comment
    “Childhood adversity experienced between ages 0-11 associated with a smaller cerebellum. New research finds that those who experience relatively common family problems early in childhood have an increased risk of mental health issues later on. The study is one of the first to look at relatively common family problems–typically mild...
  6. Making Music Dramatically Improves Young Children’s Behaviour

    by
    Comment
    Both singing and playing a musical instrument can improve young children’s behaviour, according to a recent study. The study found that children who’d been making music were more helpful to each other and had better problem-solving skills than those who’d listened to a story (Davies et al., 2013). The results...
  7. Six Neurotoxic Industrial Chemicals Linked to Rise In Brain Disorders

    by
    Comment
    “The rise in disorders like autism, ADHD and dyslexia could be linked to the industrial use of neurotoxic chemicals, according to new research published in The Lancet (Grandjean & Landrigan, 2014). The epidemiologists have identified six chemicals that could have negative effects on children’s development. This is on top of...
  8. Does birth order matter? What every parent needs to know

    by
    Comment
    “The question’s been around forever — and so have the myths surrounding it. Many factors influence how your child turns out; don’t attribute large effects to a subtle factor such as birth order. But the debate over the impact of birth order gained new urgency this summer when the results...
  9. Sleepiness at School May Be Tied to Learning Problems

    by
    Comment
    “In a new study, researchers learned that when parents described a child as presenting with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), even though clinical tests show them sleeping long enough at night, the child was apt to have a learning, attention or behavioral problem. Investigators learned that despite little indication of short...
Follow us: Facebook
Copyright © 2014 Support Together. All rights reserved. Counselors and Coaches are not employees, agents, or contactors of Support Together and have paid a fee to be listed in the Directory. Support Together does not certify credentials or information submitted by Counselors and Coaches in the Directory. It is the responsibility of each individual to verify credentials of a counselor or coach. Support Together receives commission for merchandise sold. Support Together does not provide and is not responsible for any content or information that you receive or share through the Support Groups, Directory, or Website. View:Terms of Service – Privacy Policy – Disclaimer